FAQs

This depends on the bound rate of the tariff code. A bound rate is the maximum duty that can be imposed on a tariff code. Bound rates were agreed when South Africa joined the World Trade Organization in 1995. A duty cannot be increased beyond the bound rate because it will be a violation of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. However, if the product is classified in an unbound tariff code, any level of duty can be imposed. 

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Duty increases do not expire. Duties can only be changed if an application is submitted and an investigation initiated by ITAC.

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Each case is considered on its own merits, however, ITAC generally considers a variety of factors and these include, local industry production capacity and potential, employment, investment, pricing differences between locally manufactured and imported products, market share, trade statistics, demand and supply conditions, cost and price structure among others.

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Any local manufacturer can apply for a duty increase. Even small manufacturers and producers have successfully applied for a duty increase many times.

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A duty increase will not impact imports from FTA countries. However, anti-dumping, safeguard and countervailing duties can be imposed on products imported from FTA countries. Furthermore, FTA’s contain remedies to address increasing imports. Contact us in this regard.

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This situation is referred to as a tariff anomaly and generally places local manufacturers at a pricing disadvantage. It can generally be corrected either by a duty increase on the manufactured end product or a rebate on the raw materials.

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The International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) is responsible for customs duty investigations; trade remedies; and import and export control. SARS collects the duties and ensure imported and export controls determined by ITAC are enforced at the ports of entry and exit.

Category: FAQS